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Adult Probation has an important role to play in child welfare

by David Mandel

Dr. Katreena Scott (recently returned from supporting the implementation of her Caring Dads curriculum in the UK) shared with me a comprehensive UK statutory guide on inter-agency child welfare collaboration.   Browsing the document I was struck by this item: “Probation services supervise offenders with the aim of reducing re-offending and protecting the public. By working with offenders who are parents/carers, Offender Managers can safeguard and promote the welfare of children.  Probation areas/Trusts will also…ensure support for victims, and indirectly children in the family, of convicted perpetrators of domestic abuse participating in accredited domestic abuse programmes.” (p. 10).

I really like the clear and simple identification that Adult Probation has a role to play in the welfare of children.   In the US, I would love to see more  attention paid by Adult Probation to domestic violence perpetrators as parents, and more collaboration in the US between child welfare and Adult Probation around the safety and well-being of children in domestic violence cases.

One response to “Adult Probation has an important role to play in child welfare”

  1. Richard Edwards says:

    Hi : I was pleased to read positive response to the UK Probation Service , who I work for delivering a range of 15 group interventions including Domestic and Sexual abuse programmes. I am constantly striving to raise the profile of the Probation Service as a child protection agency too often ignored, and keen to see us develop a more pro active interventions to support new fathers who are assessed as a high riks of DA . Sadly our current government is seeking to dismantle the 110 years + of Probation Work which can only serve to increase the risk to children and to victims. I would urge people to go to the NAPO website to sign an on line petition to counter this. I would also be keen to hear from US Probation / Corrections agencies with an inerest or experience of working with new fathers or DA programmes. regards Richard .

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