Domestic Violence-Informed E-Learning

2014 Webinar Series

David Mandel and Associates is pleased to announce the launch of Safe and Together™ model’s Thursday Webinar Series. These online trainings will cover a range of topics from an overview of the Safe and Together model to in-depth technical skills coaching sessions. Some training will be geared toward professionals new to the Safe and Together model. Other trainings will be targeted to Safe and Together sites and professionals already familiar and presently working with the model. David Mandel & Associates / ICIDVP online courses and trainings are only accessible to members: Become a member here

To enroll in our online courses, click on the links below to be taken to a registration page.


Previous Webinars

Safe and Together™ Model Overview

Domestic violence cases are often extremely challenging and concerning for child welfare systems and other professionals interested in the safety and well being of children. As child welfare systems seek to become more domestic violence informed, the Safe and Together model offers a field tested, innovative, comprehensive, promising practice child centered approach to domestic violence cases that involve children.  Based on our work in more than 11 states and various countries, this introduction will provide an overview of the model assumptions, principles, critical components and key practice skills. Using successful case examples from practitioner, agency and community implementation, the trainers will discuss how the model impacts child welfare policy and practice, and outcomes for families including emerging data.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Gain an understanding of the model’s principles and critical components
  • Hear about other states who have implemented the model
  • Learn to conduct a thorough assessment through the lens of the model
  • Explore how the model can enhance safety plans and case plans

Introduction to Pivoting: Building Strong Child-Centered Partnerships with Adult Domestic Violence Survivors

Professional discussions about domestic violence often focus heavily on the domestic violence survivor. When the focus is on collaborative safety planning or meeting her identified needs, it can be very constructive and even life saving. When the focus is holding her accountable for the perpetrators’ harm to the children, it can be unproductive and even dangerous to the family. Practitioners often struggle to draw boundaries between engaging the adult survivor around risk factors she needs to address, such as her own substance abuse or child abuse, and risk factors she is unable to address, such as the perpetrator’s behaviors.

Pivoting as a Practice is a potent and clarifying tool designed specifically to address these circumstances when practitioners are either blaming the adult survivor for the perpetrator’s actions or legitimately struggling with difficult circumstances, such as the intersection of domestic violence victimization and substance abuse. Pivoting a) helps practitioners ensure that they are always using the perpetrator’s patterns as context for adult survivor’s decision-making in their practice and b) serves as the foundation and guide for having compassionate, direct conversation with the domestic violence survivor about the choices she has control over.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Learn advanced assessment skills around the adult survivor’s protective capacity and ability to keep children safe in the context of the perpetrator’s behavior
  • Develop skills in articulating survivor protective capacity, while actively addressing the real risk of harm to children
  • Practice using the pivoting tool in scenarios that are relevant to their cases

An Overview of the Continuum of Domestic Violence Practice (CODVP) and the Domestic Violence-Informed Child Welfare System

Child welfare system policies and practices can range from “domestic violence destructive” to “domestic violence proficient.” At one end of the spectrum, the system, through its actions, actually increases harm to domestic violence survivors and their children. At the other end of the spectrum are systems that focus on perpetrators, not survivors, as the source of the risk and safety concerns; partner effectively with adult survivors and their advocates to increase the safety and well being of children and institutionalize domestic violence informed child welfare practice in its training, new initiatives, service provision, quality assurance and court practices. Inspired by earlier work on cultural competent and trauma informed systems, the Continuum of Domestic Violence Practice (CODVP) framework is a useful tool for child welfare systems and their communities to evaluate their own work and to envision meaningful, systemic change that focuses on child safety and well being. This training will give an overview of the history of child welfare policy and practice in domestic violence cases, discuss key issues related to creating domestic violence informed child welfare systems, introduce the continuum of practice framework and offer the opportunity for participants to reflect on their own systems and practices.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Learn about the new strength-based framework for analyzing domestic violence case practice
  • Address the various levels of system competency, from ‘DV Destructive’ through ‘DV Competent and Proficient’
  • Identify policies and practices in their own institution on the continuum
  • Discuss strategies to shift case practice to the next level toward “Domestic Violence Proficient”

Introduction to Using a Perpetrator Pattern-Based Approach to Improve Child Welfare Safety and Risk Assessment

When a child has been exposed to a parent/caregiver engaging in a pattern of coercive control and abuse toward the child’s other parent/caregiver, how can an assessment that is not grounded in the perpetrator’s behavior be considered a reliable or accurate account of the child’s risk of harm?

The child welfare system’s mission is to ensure the safety, well-being and permanency of children. In domestic violence cases, child welfare historically has tried to meet that mission by placing responsibility for ending the violence and ensuring safety for children on the available parent, which, often times, is the adult victim of the abuse. This webinar will provide child welfare professionals with an opportunity to learn new and advanced strategies for enhancing child safety by starting with a focus on perpetrators. Perpetrator-centered work requires looking at behavior assessments to learn about risk and safety for children, behavior-focused documentation, perpetrator-focused case meetings and discussions and interventions with perpetrators to reduce the risk of harm to children. By focusing on perpetrators, child welfare is free to partner with survivors, develop meaningful community collaborations, reduce unnecessary removals and make more accurate assessments of safety concerns for children. This web training will offer participants a new method of dealing with domestic violence that is grounded in and supports child welfare’s mission for child safety.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Learn advanced assessment skills around perpetrator behavior risk of harm to children
  • Develop skills in articulating perpetrator behaviors through case documentation, case meetings, service referrals and court documentation
  • Identify potential harm to families when case practice shifts focus from perpetrator behavior onto survivor behavior
  • Discuss strategies to support and maintain perpetrator-focused practice at a systems level
  • Have the unique opportunity to test learned skills before returning to a second web session

Introduction to the Safe and Together Model for Domestic Violence Advocates Co-Located with Child Welfare

Across the country, domestic violence advocates are more and more becoming part of the effort to respond to domestic violence cases involving children and many have been co-located directly within the child welfare system. These collaborations have the potential for not only improving outcomes for individual families, but for transforming the relationship between domestic violence and child welfare agencies.  Based on work in New York, New Jersey, Oregon, Florida and other locations, this webinar will examine how a perpetrator pattern-based, child-centered, survivor strength based approach can support co-located efforts. The webinar will examine advocacy practices with child welfare involved domestic violence survivors. It will also address helping child welfare remain focused on the domestic violence perpetrator, not the adult survivor, as the source of the domestic violence-related risk and safety concerns for the children.  This webinar will draw heavily on the current five month long Safe and Together Model Advocacy Institute being delivered in conjunction with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Increase their understanding of how co-located domestic violence advocates can improve outcomes for child welfare involved adult and child domestic violence survivors
  • Enhance their ability to describe the benefits of a co-located advocate and improve collaboration between child welfare and domestic violence agencies
  • Gain strategies for improving the child welfare assessment for domestic violence without increasing “domestic violence destructive” child welfare practice

Introduction to Interviewing Domestic Violence Perpetrators from a Child Welfare Perspective

As domestic violence has become increasingly prevalent on child welfare caseloads, skills for working with domestic violence perpetrators have not kept apace.  This webinar is intended to be an introduction to the skills and principles associated with good child centered interviewing practices with domestic violence perpetrators. The webinar will discuss how a foundation of a perpetrator pattern-based, behavior focused, gender responsive, non-judgmental approach can be effective when working with domestic violence perpetrators from different backgrounds. The presenters will review worker and family safety issues related to interviewing perpetrators, as well as how to avoid being manipulated by a domestic violence perpetrator. The webinar will also cover how integrate other information about the perpetrator into interviewing and documentation practice. These skills are translated to work done with the rest of the family as the presenters examine how a good child centered interviewing of the perpetrator can help strengthen the partnership between child welfare and adult domestic violence survivors.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Enhance their understanding of the basic skills and principles associated with interviewing domestic violence perpetrators
  • Increase their understanding of how a gender responsive approach enhances interviewing domestic violence perpetrators
  • Help identify strategies for keeping focus on core issues of violence and abuse
  • Learn about strategies for managing worker and family safety issues related to interviewing domestic violence perpetrators

 

Introduction to Case Planning with Domestic Violence Perpetrators from a Child Welfare Perspective

Date & Time: Thursday, June 26, 2014 1:00-3:00PM EST Length: 2.0 hours

Presenter: Kristen Selleck, National Training Director, & Kyle Pinto, National Trainer

Cost: $29 (with free basic membership)

Domestic violence-informed child welfare practice requires the ability to case plan for the domestic violence perpetrator. In fact, when a child welfare system becomes domestic violence competent or proficient, there would likely be more of an extensive plan for the perpetrator than for the domestic violence survivor.  In this introductory webinar, the presenters will cover the basics of child welfare case planning for domestic violence perpetrators. Starting with perpetrator pattern-based assessment, there will be an examination of the full range of case planning options, including coordination with criminal court and law enforcement, behaviorally focused agreements with the perpetrator and referrals for effective and meaningful perpetrator services. The presenters will highlight the importance of a “beyond services” approach to case planning with perpetrators, especially the value of this approach in areas with no or low quality batterer intervention programs.  The webinar will also address the importance of a dependency court approach to domestic violence focused on the perpetrator and also the basics of evaluating change in perpetrators.

Participants attending this web training will:

  • Increase their understanding of case planning strategies for child welfare involved domestic violence perpetrators
  • Be able to discuss how the value of an “beyond services” approach to case planning with domestic violence perpetrators
  • Be able to identify basic strategies for assessing change in perpetrators

 

David Mandel & Associates / ICIDVP online courses and trainings are only accessible to members: Become a member here

To enroll in our online courses, click on the links above to be taken to a registration page. 

We look forward to collaborating with you this year!