Safe & Together

Request for Presentations Now Open!

The Safe and Together Institute is requesting workshop presentations for our 2017 Safe and Together Symposium at the St. Anthony Hotel in San Antonio Texas. We are interested in following type of proposals:

  • Category I: Presentations from Safe and Together faculty and sites across the globe
  • Category II: Other domestic violence-informed practice material

Category I:
Presentations from Safe and Together faculty and sites across the globe

These are proposals from agencies, communities or individuals who received prior Safe and Together training and have implemented some aspect of the model.  The primary purpose of these workshops will be to share, with other Symposium participants, lessons learned about the Safe and Together model and its impact on policy, practice and outcomes for families.  This year we also are inviting our faculty and Certified Trainers to submit proposals on areas of interest and expertise.

Category II:
Other domestic violence-informed practice material

We are also interested in workshop proposals on other domestic violence-informed topics. This category is explicitly for material NOT specific to the Safe and Together Model but is compatible with its domestic violence-informed approach. Workshop proposals in this area will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

Submit a Proposal


This year’s Symposium will have the following areas of focus:

  • Real Strength: Adult Survivors’ Protective Capacities as Parents
  • Voices of Children: Adult Child Survivors and Their Experiences
  • Working with Men as Parents: Practicing as if Men’s Choices Matter to Child and Family Functioning
  • Moving Texas Forward: Advancing Domestic Violence-Informed Practice Across the Lone Star State

Real Strength: Adult Survivors’ Protective Capacities as Parents:

A cornerstone of domestic violence-informed practice is partnering with the adult survivor around the safety and well-being of the children. This requires an accurate assessment of their parenting strengths as it relates to the domestic violence and the needs of the children. Research indicates that domestic violence survivors can be excellent parents. Proposals in this area of focus need to highlight 1) empirical evidence of these specific strengths, e.g. stories from survivors of parenting through domestic violence, 2) strategies, policies and programming that are based on or assess for these specific strengths or 3) research that focuses on adult survivors’ parenting strengths.  Proposals that focus on barriers or gaps related to these factors will also be considered.

Voices of Children: Adult Child Survivors and Their Experiences:

Child behavioral, emotional and physical functioning can be significantly impacted by domestic violence perpetrator’s actions. Good policy and practice is informed by the experiences and voices of children. Narratives from adult children exposed to violence (i.e., adults who experienced domestic violence as a child) can play a critical role in helping us understand what children need in these situations. Proposals in this area need to highlight the experiences and voices of adults who were children exposed to perpetrator behaviors. Proposals in this area need to highlight the diverse experiences of children who grew up with violence. These include proposals focused on children’s relationships with the adult survivor, the perpetrator, siblings and/or their extended family/kin.

Working with Men as Parents: Practicing as if Men’s Choices Matter to Child and Family Functioning: 

The foundation of a perpetrator pattern-based approach is the simple concept that men’s behaviors matter to child and family functioning. Domestic violence-destructive practice often ignores this fact and blames the adult survivor, usually the mother, for the perpetrator’s behaviors. When assessments ignore this simple reality they often represent an incomplete, deficit view of family functioning that is often most harmful to poor families and families from historically oppressed communities. Good family assessments seek to understand the positive or negative impact male caregivers have on child and family functioning whether they live in the home or not. Proposals in this area need to highlight how we assess and integrate male caregiver’s behaviors into our work with families. These proposals can be focused on policy, service delivery or practice. Proposals focused on prevention activities are also welcome. It is important that these proposals explicitly make the connection between the idea that good fathering includes respectful treatment of the child’s other parent.

Moving Texas Forward: Advancing Domestic Violence-Informed Practice Across the Lone Star State:

Texas child protection is making significant steps toward becoming domestic violence-informed.  Domestic violence advocates in Texas are working toward improved collaboration with child welfare.  This includes new funding for Batterer Intervention programs and a child welfare domestic violence practice guide that integrates core domestic violence-informed principles.  Proposals in this area need to highlight Texas domestic violence practice consistent with 1) the needs of the three primary audiences: child welfare, advocates and batterer intervention programs and 2) consistent with domestic violence-informed practice principles.

The Symposium Audience

The Safe and Together Symposium is designed for both professionals experienced with the model as well as those attending Safe and Together model training for the first time. The Symposium audience includes child welfare frontline workers, supervisors, managers/administrators; child welfare attorneys; domestic violence advocates, counselors, administrators; policy makers; researchers; judges; Guardians ad Litem, CASAs; home visitors; mental health and substance abuse professionals; fatherhood program staff; and/or batterer intervention providers. Participants should be interested in enhancing safety for children, developing responsible fatherhood practices, supporting survivors of domestic violence and intervening with perpetrators of domestic violence.


Submitting a Presentation Proposal

Before submitting a proposal, please consider the following:

Presentation Criteria*:

Presenters will be asked to identify which category they would like their proposal considered for and provide information on each of the bullet points in that category. Workshops will be considered for 1 hour and 15 minute sessions.

Category I: Presentations from Safe and Together faculty and sites across the globe

  • A description of training and/or consultation received in the Safe and Together model
  • A description of the application or implementation of the Safe and Together model principles, critical components and/or practices to policy, practice and/or community collaboration
  • Lessons learned, practice and policy implementation and outcomes including formal evaluation data

Category II: Other domestic violence-informed practice material

Submission Requirements

Please submit your proposal by July 1, 2017. Before beginning the online form below, please note you will be asked to provide the following information.

  • Name, credentials, current title and agency (Up to 3 presenters)
  • Biography to be seen in program (250 word limit)
  • Category selection and presentation criteria outline (seen above)*
  • Presentation Title and Abstract (250 word limit)
  • Full presentation description for review process (750 word limit)
  • Up to 3 objectives of the workshop

Selection Review Criteria: 

Presenters will be chosen and notified by July 14, 2017. Proposals will be reviewed based on the following points:

  • Clarity
  • Overall benefit to symposium participants of receiving this information/skill building/ideas
  • Relevance to one of more of the areas of focus
  • Collaborative presentations are welcome; please limit the number of presenters to three
  • Accepted proposals will receive 25% off registration fee (including Core Practice Training or Pre-Symposium)

Proposals due by July 1, 2017

Submit a Proposal